UNTITLED/ORIGINS exhibition 15.5.15 @ SPACE (Creative Collective Copenhagen)

The following 10 works were exhibited at SPACE on May 15th, 2015 for my first solo exhibition titled: UNTITLED/ORIGINS

Untitled/Cosmogenesis
Mixed media on canvas
(80×140 cm)
SOLD

Untitled.cosmogenesis_2015_Pablo_Saborio_painting

Untitled/Abiogenesis
Mixed media on canvas
(150×150 cm)
SOLD

Untitled.abiogenesis_2015_Pablo_Saborio

Untitled/Structurae
Mixed media on canvas
(100×120 cm)
SOLD

Untitled.Structurae_2015_Pablo_Saborio_artist

Untitled/Replication
Mixed media on canvas
(100×80 cm x 2)

Click on image for better resolution

Untitled.replication_2015_Pablo_Saborio_Artist

Untitled/Bivalve
Mixed media on canvas
(80×80 cm)
Private collection

Untitled.Bivalve_2015_Pablo_Saborio_art

Untitled/Vulva
Mixed media on canvas
(100×100 cm)

Untitled.vulva_2015_Pablo_Saborio_painting

Untitled/Post-Chrysalis
Mixed media on canvas
(100×120 cm)
SOLD

Untitled.post-chrysalis_2015_Pablo_Saborio_art

Untitled/Scintilla
Mixed media on canvas
(100×100 cm)

Untitled.Scintilla_2015_Pablo_Saborio_paintings

Untitled/Meristem
Mixed media on canvas
(100×100 cm )
SOLD

Untitled.Meristem_2015_Pablo_Saborio_art

Untitled/Mesoglea
Mixed media on canvas
(150×150 cm)

Untitled.Mesoglea_2015_Pablo_Saborio_Artist

©2015 Pablo Saborío

Beyond Language

Art in the 21st century

“Despite all its powers, society cannot sustain the artist if
it is impervious to the vision of the artist.” – Henry Miller

What is art today? More precisely, what does art convey? Art has become an adornment, mere embellishment to our mechanical society. It is what you hang behind an office desk, in the hallway of a bank, in the solitary confines of a museum. It is what is read while we travel between two points, what is listened to while we drive to work, what we assist to in moments of laziness and passive submission to entertainment. It is that which is viewed askance, situated in the periphery, unobtrusive to the real function of society: business.

Art is no longer an expression of a deeper vision of reality; and if it is, we, at least, no longer perceive it as such. It is aesthetic, no doubt. But it is not beautiful enough to secure a prominent role in our routines. As far as we are concerned, it is pastime, an elegant but inferior activity in life. It conveys no truth or doubt to the spectator. Life is predetermined and already decided; art is solely an amusement, even if it constantly fights against modern life. It exists as a hallucination, a sort of intoxication that can easily be dismissed as unreal and irrelevant. The serious business of life cannot be questioned; it has no room for the artist and his or her artwork that challenges the unconsciousness of its drives.

And yet some artists do become idols in this culture and their art known universally, but is their artwork studied as profoundly as we study engineering or business administration? The artists’ message, their restructuring of our understanding of reality, their incessant re-questioning of our basic assumptions, remain quite below the general level of public attention. We all recognize the dripping clock of Dali or the visual massacre of the Guernica, some will recognize the dreamy seascape of La Mer or the cavernous sorrow of the Adagio for Strings, the name of Humbert Humbert or Harry Hope may be familiar to a few, a minority will recall The Waste Land or a Season in Hell; but what is noteworthy here is that recognizing these works of art by their name is no sign that we have delved in them and studied them profoundly. We care only superficially of what they imply, what the message is all about. There is no understanding that an artist is a transformation of the human being and is attempting a redefinition of what is to be alive in a mysterious universe. We assume art as a gift to culture by one and the same kind of individual that already lives in that culture.

Art has now been banalized, it has become a career and today there are flocks of artists that operate as businesses, as factories manufacturing objects to be bought and superficially enjoyed. The true artist is rare these days, he or she is muted and oppressed by this contradiction. How to bring forth a genuine work of art in this spurious world that is driven by money? The voice of art is being drowned by the roar of commerce and trivial entertainment. Society has absorbed art; and the artist has docilely submitted to his or her new harrowing role of ornamentalist. The commandments of art are now thus: you shall entertain, you shall impress, you shall produce the beautiful, you shall be famous, but under no circumstance should you dishonor your loving parent: society. Society does not want individuals to think and act differently, to produce controversies that may outstrip the authority of the status quo. Art may produce change insofar as it remains within the parameters of the socially digestible.

The artist is no longer an artist. He or she has forgotten that divine calling of making of life an experiment. The artist must suffer eternally, must wrestle with the incongruities and absurdities of living and dying, must explore the unknown realm of the spirit and  (in the words of Rimbaud)become a seer. The work produced thereafter will be only an inkling, an announcement of vaster realms accessible to all, it is an opening at the roof of an abyss for those who dare plunge into it. The experiential adventure of consciousness is now going extinct, there are few enthusiasts left. It is a form of wisdom that society ignores and lumps together under the heading “esoteric mumbo-jumbo”, or more spitefully, “madness”. (Hasn’t history shown that many great artists were deemed mad in their time, only later to be proclaimed visionaries?). And yet this wisdom is no particular statement or philosophy; it is an active engagement with the mystery of creation, what once was the domain of the artist and religious fervent. Today art as well as religion is downplayed as historical curiosity, still operating as long as they leave intact, and even follow, the new order created by the God of modern civilization: money.

town drunk

Artist beer drinking

It feels good
not being an artist
no language to impress
philosophical thoughts on cheese
a bit guilty of the next beer
depleting bank account

it feels good
to walk on snow
so crisp and pure
drinking the next beer
getting drunk
and all the rest

it feels good
to see the snow
fall
my cold breath
dunking beers
and all the rest

if feels good
to have left Berlin
now just a town drunk
not even a
punk

 

 

 

poems

Famous and rare modern art paintings at Statens Museum for Kunst, Copenhagen-Denmark

The National Gallery of Art in Copenhagen (Denmark) has a very special collection of famous painters, such as Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Andre Derain, Georges Braque and many others. Some of these works are classics of modern art while others are rare, seemingly paint sketches, of these great artists.

The museum itself is free, and has mostly European artists with an emphasis on Scandinavian painters. Modern art paintings are on the top floors of this Danish museum.


Edvard Munch, Death Struggle 1915
Norwegian Painter


Vilhelm Hammershoi, Seated Female Nude, 1889
Danish Painter


Peder Severin Kroyer, Boys Bathing at Skagen. Summer Evening, 1899
Danish Painter (Badende drenge en sommeraften ved Skagens strand)


Carl Bloch, Samson and the Philistine, 1863
Danish Painter (Samson hos filistrene)


Henri Matisse, Landscape near Collioure. Study for “The Joy of Life”, 1905
French Painter


Henri Matisse, Portrait of Madame Matisse. The Green Line, 1905
French Artist


Henri Matisse, Nude with a White Scarf, 1909
French Painter


Henri Matisse, Goldfish, 1912
French


Henri Matisse, Still Life with Nutcracker, Ca 1916
French


Henri Matisse, Young Woman Looking at the Sea, 1923
French


Henri Matisse, Pink Onions, 1906-1907
French


Henri Matisse, Odalisque with a Screen 1923
French


Henri Matisse, Odalisque, 1923
French


André Derain, Woman in a Chemise, 1906
French Painter and illustrator
Co-founder of Fauvism with Matisse


André Derain, The Church near Carrieres-sur-Seine, 1909
French


Georges Braque, The Harbour at l’Estaque
French Painter, renown for his work in Cubism along Picasso.


Georges Braque, The Metronome, 1909
French


Georges Braque, Trees at l’Estaque, 1908
French


Georges Braque, Melon, Fruits and Cup, 1925
French


Jean Metzinger, Woman with horse, 1912
French Painter, inspired by Fauvism and Impressionism but known for his Cubism.


Fernand Léger, Woman with Vase, 1924
French painter, sculptor, filmmaker


Asger Oluf Jorn, The wheel of life -January Picture from the Suite of Seasons, 1953
Danish Painter


Michael Kvium, The power of thought, 1991
Danish Painter


Pablo Picasso, Glass with Lemon Slice, 1913
Spanish Artist

Hope you enjoy all these modern art paintings, I will keep posting the best works of art from best museums around the world.

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